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Many people in California who get married for the second time feel like they’ve finally “gotten it right.” However, second marriages are no more likely to survive than first marriages. In fact, studies have shown that second and third marriages are even more likely to end in divorce. Here’s why so many people end up splitting up for the second or third time.

Why do so many second marriages end in divorce?

Second marriages often involve complicated family situations. By the time you get married for a second time, you’re often marrying someone who already has kids from a previous marriage. As a result, their kids might not like the idea of having a step-parent in their lives. They might be disrespectful and argumentative and blame their step-parent for “breaking up” their parents. This can cause tensions in the family that lead to divorce.

Similarly, most couples in second or third marriages don’t have children together. They’re less likely to “stay together for the kids” because they don’t have any kids, only step-children who might not like them anyway. Their family may have a shakier foundation than first marriages.

Once you’ve reached your second or third marriage, you’re also more likely to file for divorce because you’ve already been through it once. You survived your first divorce, so why not go through it again if you’re not happy in your current marriage? Many couples are quick to spring for divorce instead of going to counseling or attempting to work out their issues over time.

What should you do if you’re thinking about divorce?

Whether this is your first divorce or your third, nobody can do it alone. An experienced family law attorney may help you dissolve your marriage while protecting your interests. In extreme situations, your attorney might also help you pursue a case against an abusive spouse.